INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PLAN

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PLAN

Health – Education 6

International finance ministers have approved a world bank plan aimed at approved child in developing countries. The plan is called “education for all.” Its goal is to provide an education for all children between the ages of five and cleven by the year two-thousand-fifteen. The announcement came at the close of world bank and international monetary fund meetings last month in washington DC

                The world bank estimates that about one of every five children. About seventy-five percent of these uneducated children live in southern Africa and south asia.

                Finance ministers at the meeting strongly promote the education plan. However, they failed to settle a dispute about ho to pay for it. The united states wants the world bank to give money called grants to poor nations instead of loans that have to be repaid. European nations are opposed to this policy.

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They say the grants would use up the world bank's resources. So far, only a few industrialized countries, including Germany and the Netherlands, have promised to provide money for te program.

                The world bank plans to launch the new education program in the next three months. Officials will provide money to ten poor countries. They will choose countries that have developed strong education reform plans but lack the money to put them in place. Tanzania, Malawi, Senegal, Bangladesh and India are among the nations being considered for this project. It is expected to cost up to five-thousand-million dollars.

                World bank president James Wolfensohn hopes the ten countries will be chosen by late June. That is when the world's seven leading industrial countries will gather in canada for their yearly economic meeting. Mister Wolfensohn hopes an agreement to fully pay for the “education for all” program can be reached during those talks.

                In time, the world bank plans to give money to eighty-eight developing countries that have a large number of uneducated children. The bank says that at least one-fourth of the countries are in southern africa and south asia. Latin America and the middle east are also areas in need of assistance.

 

Vocabulary:

1 estimate: estimate

2 settle: to agree on something, to settle something for the last time or in a satisfactory way, to settle something

3 disputes: controversy, debate

4 grant : sponsorship, subsidy

5 launch: put something, who into action, start

6 assistance

 

Translation:

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PLAN

                International finance ministers have approved a world bank plan to educate every child in developing countries. This plan is called “education for all”. The plan's goal is to educate all children between the ages of 5 and 11 by 2015. The announcement came at the conclusion of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund meetings in September. before in Washington DC

                The World Bank estimates that 125 million children between the ages of 5 and 11 in poor countries are out of school. One out of every five children cannot go to school. About 5% of these illiterate children live in southern Africa and in South Asia.

                At this annual meeting, the Finance ministers welcomed the education plan. However, they failed to settle the debate over how to pay for the US plan to want the World Bank to provide money in the form of grants to poor countries instead of loans, and these countries would then have to return. European countries oppose this policy. They say the grants will drain the World Bank's resources. So far only a few industrialized countries, including Germany and the Netherlands, have promised to fund the program.

                The World Bank plans to launch this new education program in the next three months. Bank officials will provide money to 3 poor countries. They will choose countries that have developed strong education reform programs but lack the funds to implement them. Tanzania, Malawi, Senegal, Bangladesh and India are the countries being considered for inclusion in this project. The project is expected to cost up to 10 million dollars.

                The World Bank's director general, James Wolfensohn, expects these ten countries to be selected by the end of June. It was the time when the world's seven leading industrial countries met in Canada for their annual meeting to discuss their economic problems. Mr. Wolfensohn hopes an agreement on full payment of the “education for all” program will be reached during those discussions.

                Right at this time, the World Bank intends to provide money to 88 developing countries with large numbers of children out of school. The bank says little that at least a quarter of these countries are located in southern Africa and in South Asia. Latin America and the Middle East are also areas in need of help.

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