We often get asked questions about Digital Marketing and Personal Branding or the importance of marketing education by freelancers. Questions related to how the freelancer started his career.

Although we are experts in marketing translation, we thought it would be more accurate to ask a professional marketer.

So we reached out to Sarah, who is an expert in both Digital Marketing and Translation. Moreover, she is very excited to read and hear the questions! We hope you enjoy this interview.

  • Hello, Sarah. For readers who don't know you, you are the CEO at Retro Digital. Retro is a Digital Marketing company that you founded a few years ago with your husband Alan. And it has become wildly successful with branches in several countries. You also have degrees in Digital Marketing, PR and Law. Moreover, you also have a background in translation after working as a translator in the military and later as a freelancer. How did you change your profession and why did you do it?

It all came by chance. I have always loved languages. So when I was in 6, I already spoke English, Czech and Slovak. Since I'm bad at math, I learn something else I'm good at to get a good grade!

When I finished school at 17, I had the option of working as a linguist at university or joining the military to become a translator. As someone with a bit of an adrenaline rush, I chose the military.

When I was 19, I discovered that I was expecting a daughter, which ended my career in the military. So, on maternity leave, I started my own linguistics business and started studying a law degree so I could work and fit in with everything while being a mom.

When I was young and broke, I didn't have money to study marketing, so I taught myself and growing a business was too much for me. After having a son, I went back to work as an LSP. Because my role is in Marketing, I continued my Master's degree in Digital Marketing.

A few years on, my husband and I got sick of working too much, and after we lost the baby (that's why we chose the deer as our company logo, it's called Oisin, in English. Ireland means little deer and that's what we call the baby) we decided to work in moderation. And then we founded the company Retro Digital.

After seeing how bad digital marketers and web designers are in reality, our sole mission is to do good, be honest in our work, be ethical, observe people, and don't overwork (although the last one didn't really work, haha!). Although no idea but it seems to have gone live. 

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  • Do you think it's important for freelancers to specialize in a particular field and why not get a degree outside of the field of translation? What is the reason?

Of course! Whenever we get a CV from a freelancer claiming to have studied 10 languages ​​and every major in the world, this is very suspicious indeed. We would love to work with a professional and do a good job at it. Even if there's some unusual problem, it's just a need somewhere.

  • Do you think translators should have at least basic knowledge of Marketing? What is the reason?

Regarding personal marketing, I think all freelancers need to understand personal branding. Also, it depends on what your major is. If you're a skilled content writer, then you really don't need to learn marketing because it's not relevant to your job.

But if you work in creative translation or marketing, you definitely need to understand the psychological aspects of marketing to get results for your clients.

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  • What problems do you see in the worldwide translation industry and what solutions do you think needs to be solved?

Oh, my God, I didn't even think about this. First of all, here's a disclaimer: I love languages, but God, I've never come across an industry that's stuck like this!

2019 is the time when the industry comes out of its shell and modernizes like other industries in the world. What I didn't like the most was the way the industry took marketing services, added the word “multilingual” in front of it and started offering this service.

Do keyword research and SEO, for example they are professional digital marketing services, so don't screw it up.

  • Can you say how many languages? How have they helped you get to where you are today?

I learned Arabic, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian, Italian, Japanese and English. But the main ones I use now are Czech, Slovak, French and German.

I also use a little Irish when I'm drunk. Therefore, language really opened up the world. I love talking to people in their language and understanding how they work. I wouldn't be where I am today without my language skills.

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  • What would you say or advice to translators who are frustrated because they can't find freelance work?

Let's keep trying. Be yourself, be friendly, and make connections with people. I love working with people I trust and get along with, so just be friends and you'll do just fine. 

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  • What keeps you so motivated?

My kids, Alan… But my main motivation for the job is to see my clients grow. I love taking their ideas and bringing them to life through great marketing campaigns.

There's nothing better than seeing all that hard work pay off when it comes to fruition! And see how it delighted customers and the impact it had on their business.

A short interview but brought the translation team of IDICHTHUAT more knowledge and understanding of the future path when going deeper into the field of translation.

We also hope that the sharing of this interview will give you some experience if you are a translator, and if you are someone who is looking for a professional translation company, please consider carefully in choosing a translator. choose.

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